BrickBox

BrickBox is a concept design for a period product subscription box targeted at transgender and gender non-conforming people who menstruate. 

BrickBox gets its name from one of the most popular events in North American LGBTQ history, the Stonewall Uprising. Though it is largely unimportant today, it is often debated who threw the first brick to ignite the uprising. 

I used this project to explore more analog creative opportunities. The branding is inspired by grassroots movements and zine culture, so I wanted to ensure the design was authentic to that. I developed my own font for the interior boxes by hand-pressing found letterpress letters and scanning the pages. The collage inside the box was also hand-made and scanned.

'BrickBox' prototype, unpacked. Open box with 3 smaller boxes (labeled tampons, pads, and liners), underwear, and an educational insert.
BrickBox sample contents

Each box is themed with an event or person from history—a bit of reading material for the restroom. The prototype pictured is themed around the 1965 sit-ins at Dewy's, a lunch counter in Philadelphia. BrickBox's brand voice and image takes its cues from Queer Zine culture.

'BrickBox' box exterior. Three boxes with 'BrickBox' spray painted on the side along with other industrial shapes.
BrickBox box exterior
'BrickBox' interior close-up.
BrickBox interior detail

To accompany the box, I created a series of spray painted posters to highlight the fraught relationship between transgender people and bathrooms. The posters were hung at Western Washington University, so three of them specifically focus on the lack of accessible all-gender bathrooms in that space.

Spray-painted posters made of old newspaper hung on a bathroom wall. Title poster: statistics from the 2015 U.S. transgender survey presented by BrickBox. First poster: 75% of trans men reported sometimes or always avoiding public restrooms. Second poster: 34% of trans people in Washington have avoided eating or drinking to avoid needing to use the bathroom. Third poster: 61% of trans people in Washington have avoided using a public bathroom because they were afraid.
Spray-painted posters made of old newspaper hung on a bathroom wall. First poster: 22 of Western's 61 buildings have all-gender bathrooms. Second poster: 62% of Western's all-gender bathrooms are ADA accessible. Third poster: 7 of Western's all-gender bathrooms have limited access or limited hours.
Spray painted poster on newsprint. Poster reads: 22 of Western's 61 buildings have all-gender bathrooms.
Spray painted poster on newsprint. Poster reads: 62% of Western's all-gender bathrooms are ADA accessible.
Spray painted poster on newsprint. Poster reads: 7 of Western's all-gender bathrooms have limited access or limited hours.
Role
Designer
YEar
2019